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  | ARTICLE  | Am. J. innov. res. appl. sci. Volume 15,  Issue-2, Pages 10-16 (August, 2022)
   Research Article 2
 
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  American Journal of Innovative Research & Applied Sciences
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American Journal of innovative
Research & Applied Sciences 
ISSN  2429-5396 (Online)
OCLC Number: 920041286
Authors Contact

*Correspondant author and authors Copyright © 2022:

| Kelly Ngesungwo Jabosung |



Affiliation.


The University of Buea | Department of Sociology and Anthropology | Cameroon |


This article is made freely available as part of this journal's Open Access: ID | Kelly-Ref2-ajira200722 | 
| AUGUST | VOLUME 15 | ISSUE N° 2 | 2022 |
ABSTRACT

Background: The Anglophone regions of Cameroon have since 2016 witnessed a socio-political crisis which has deteriorated overtime. Marked by massive displacement and disruption of education, children in these regions have been exposed to various forms of violence and exploitation, association and use by state and non-state armed groups which negatively affects their wellbeing and development. The recruitment of children, including girls, is often considered as forced, coerced, manipulated or “voluntary,” although the distinction has no legal significance and recruitment remains unlawful for minors, regardless of the process. Objectives: This paper explores the national and international frameworks protecting children in humanitarian crisis and the specific experiences of children associated with armed groups and armed forces in the ongoing socio-political crisis in Cameroon. Methodology: The research is based on key informant interviews, FGDs and observations conducted in the Northwest and Southwest regions of Cameroon. The data for this article is based on qualitative analysis of the narratives of 10 children associated with armed groups and armed forces in detention, 10 children associated with armed groups selected from the communities, 10 community members and, 10 INGO staff selected from the communities under study. The sample size was purely purposive, given the sensitive nature of the research. Results: Findings from this research reveals that, children’s association with armed groups and armed forces are diverse in levels and forms which can either be triggered by personal, family and community factors. Conclusion: This paper recommends that, children who have been unlawfully recruited and who are accused of having committed domestic or international crimes during armed conflicts should be regarded primarily as victims, not as perpetrators, and treated as such, and every programming aimed at sentencing or response should aim at rehabilitation and reintegration and not punishment.
Key Words: justice for children, child protection, Children associated with armed groups and armed forces, armed conflict, rehabilitation, reintegration.

CHILDREN ASSOCIATED WITH ARMED GROUPS AND ARMED FORCES: EXPERIENCES FROM CAMEROON


| Kelly Ngesungwo Jabosung |.  Am. J. innov. res. appl. sci.  2022; 15(2):10-16.

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